Security

OAuth 2 Authentication and Authorization

Connexion supports one of the three OAuth 2 handling methods. With Connexion, the API security definition must include a x-tokenInfoFunc or set TOKENINFO_FUNC env var.

x-tokenInfoFunc must contain a reference to a function used to obtain the token info. This reference should be a string using the same syntax that is used to connect an operationId to a Python function when routing. For example, an x-tokenInfoFunc of auth.verifyToken would pass the user’s token string to the function verifyToken in the module auth.py. The referenced function accepts a token string as argument and should return a dict containing a scope field that is either a space-separated list or an array of scopes belonging to the supplied token. This list of scopes will be validated against the scopes required by the API security definition to determine if the user is authorized. You can supply a custom scope validation func with x-scopeValidateFunc or set SCOPEVALIDATE_FUNC env var, otherwise connexion.decorators.security.validate_scope will be used as default.

The recommended approach is to return a dict which complies with RFC 7662. Note that you have to validate the active or exp fields etc. yourself.

The sub property of the Token Info response will be passed in the user argument to the handler function.

Deprecated features, retained for backward compability:

  • As alternative to x-tokenInfoFunc, you can set x-tokenInfoUrl or TOKENINFO_URL env var. It must contain a URL to validate and get the token information which complies with RFC 6749. When both x-tokenInfoUrl and x-tokenInfoFunc are used, Connexion will prioritize the function method. Connexion expects the authorization server to receive the OAuth token in the Authorization header field in the format described in RFC 6750 section 2.1. This aspect represents a significant difference from the usual OAuth flow.
  • scope field can also be named scopes.
  • sub field can also be named uid.

You can find a minimal OAuth example application in Connexion’s “examples” folder.

Basic Authentication

With Connexion, the API security definition must include a x-basicInfoFunc or set BASICINFO_FUNC env var. It uses the same semantics as for x-tokenInfoFunc, but the function accepts three parameters: username, password and required_scopes. If the security declaration of the operation also has an oauth security requirement, required_scopes is taken from there, otherwise it’s None. This allows authorizing individual operations with oauth scope while using basic authentication for authentication.

ApiKey Authentication

With Connexion, the API security definition must include a x-apikeyInfoFunc or set APIKEYINFO_FUNC env var. It uses the same semantics as for x-basicInfoFunc, but the function accepts two parameters: apikey and required_scopes.

You can find a minimal Basic Auth example application in Connexion’s “examples” folder.

Bearer Authentication (JWT)

With Connexion, the API security definition must include a x-bearerInfoFunc or set BEARERINFO_FUNC env var. It uses the same semantics as for x-tokenInfoFunc, but the function accepts one parameter: token.

You can find a `minimal JWT example application`_ in Connexion’s “examples/openapi3” folder.

HTTPS Support

When specifying HTTPS as the scheme in the API YAML file, all the URIs in the served Swagger UI are HTTPS endpoints. The problem: The default server that runs is a “normal” HTTP server. This means that the Swagger UI cannot be used to play with the API. What is the correct way to start a HTTPS server when using Connexion?